September 30, 2014: NCERT Seminar On Workplace Investigations


September 30, 2014: NCERT Seminar On Workplace Investigations

How employers investigate and resolve employee complaints of discrimination, harassment, retaliation and other misconduct can have a serious impact on liability, workplace morale, productivity and culture. I am proud to announce that the Northern California Employment Round Table (NCERT) has scheduled a top-notch presentation titled “Responding to Employee Complaints: From Investigation to Resolution.” This presentation will be held on September 30, 2014 from 8:30-10:30a.m. at the County of Alameda Administration Building in Oakland, CA.

As President of NCERT, I have the honor of welcoming all attendees and introducing our distinguished panel comprised of:

Human Resources professionals, attorneys, business owners and executives should not miss this event. For further details and registration information, please refer to this flyer. I look forward to seeing you there!

Pitfalls To Avoid With Employee Advocacy


Pitfalls To Avoid With Employee Advocacy

Employee advocacy” is a hot topic among marketers and PR folks these days. This focus on using employees to spread a company’s message via social media is an exciting and seemingly perfect fit for many companies. Simply, why shouldn’t a company harness the power of a faithful workforce? Unfortunately, there are many legal issues that should be examined before any company turns employees loose on social media.

In my post titled “5 Employment Law Considerations For Employee Advocacy” for Maximize Social Business, I examine some of the legal pitfalls to be avoided regarding employee advocacy. Let me know what further pitfalls your company has faced and/or has already addressed? Does your company embrace employee advocacy?

Two Worlds Have Collided


Two Worlds Have Collided

As many of you know, I have been fortunate to be an active member of the Contra Costa County Bar Association and have served on the Board of Directors for several years. The Bar Association is one of the great professional organizations to which I belong and contribute in connection with my “day job.”

When I am not involved with the CCCBA, or providing legal services to clients, I try to enjoy family time and giving back to the community in additional ways. This past year, I had the privilege of serving as the President of Walnut Creek Little League. It was an honor to be President and to have worked with other community volunteers during the 75th anniversary of Little League, the 40th anniversary of Softball Little League, and the 25th anniversary of Little League’s Challenger Division. Coincidentally, this year was also Walnut Creek’s 100th birthday. This past season, WCLL served a record number of players (almost 900) ranging from ages 5-14 years old.

These two worlds collided in the August 2014 edition of the Contra Costa Lawyer magazine. The entire edition of the magazine was devoted to the “secret lives” of legal professionals in Contra Costa County. Nicole Mills (a wonderful legal professional and mother of two WCLL players) exposed to the local legal community my secret life as WCLL President. Thank you Nicole for a flattering article, and for helping to expose the far more interesting secret lives of other Contra Costa County attorneys and judges.

The Law On Social Media and Employment Is Still Evolving


The Law On Social Media and Employment Is Still Evolving

Social media and technology keep advancing at a rapid pace. The law has furiously been trying to catch up. For a short time, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) was at the forefront of creating the framework for social media and employment law. In June 2014, however, the U.S. Supreme Court stalled, at least temporarily, the NLRB’s efforts to create new guidance.

In my July 2014 post for Maximize Social Business, I briefly analyzed the case of National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning and how the Supreme Court will impact the NLRB’s progress. And, I specifically analyzed how this court decision will impact the landscape of social media and employment law. Only time will tell if the NLRB will catch up with its work before technology moves beyond today’s workplace technologies.

Deleting Your Facebook Posts Could Cost You


Deleting Your Facebook Posts Could Cost You

Deleting Facebook posts may get you in hot water legally.

Most everyone has read about warnings concerning sharing too much information on social media and employees who have posted videos, photos or comments that have resulted in getting “Facebook fired.”

Most folks do not know, however, that deleting social media posts, can, if deleted at certain times, can result in Court sanctions. In my post titled “Former Employee Sanctioned For Deleting Posts on Facebook” for Maximize Social Business, I analyze a recent case from Nevada. Learn why a Court in a sexual harassment case instructed a jury against someone who deleted Facebook posts about her former employer.