Handbooks and Policies

Yahoo!, Telecommuting and March Madness in the Workplace


UPDATED: March 11, 2013: For the second consecutive time, my article for Windmill Networking (MaximizeSocialBusiness) has been highlighted in, and chosen as one of the top Blog posts by CommPRO.biz. Please see the March 8, 2013 Daily Headlines and Features by CommPRO.biz Last month, my article titled “Social Media in the Workplace: Hoaxes, Lies and a President’s Unconstitutional Behavior” was chosen as one of the top Blog Posts by, and highlighted in, the February 8, 2013 Daily Headlines and Features by CommPRO.biz

ORIGINAL MESSAGE: March 8, 2013: Yahoo! recently announced the end of telecommuting for its workforce. Yahoo!’s change in policy has spurred many discussions about the advantages and disadvantages of telecommuting. And, for the majority of employers who permit telecommuting, it is critical that they have clear and comprehensive policies in place to address the many issues of a telecommuting workforce. In my March 2013 post for Windmill Networking (now MaximizeSocialBusiness.com), I examine some of these issues. In addition, I revisit the many issues employers and employees face during the season of March Madness. See my article titled: “Social Media and Employment Law: March Madness (and Yahoo!/Telecommuting) Causes Craziness in the Workplace“.

 

Looking Forward To Another Great Year With The Contra Costa County Bar Association


My employment law seminar at the Contra Costa County Bar Association was a success!

On January 25, 2013, I was installed (sworn in) for my second year as a Board Member of the Contra Costa County Bar Association (CCCBA). The CCCBA has been considered one of the premier bar associations in the nation for quite some time due to a dedicated staff, Executive Director, and an active community of attorneys and volunteers.

I also had the opportunity to kick off the new year for the CCCBA’s Employment Law Section by co-presenting an Employment Law Update seminar to other attorneys in the CCCBA. I provided information regarding changes to the Department of Fair Employment and Housing and the Fair Employment and Housing Act, issues with social media in the workplace, changes to various Labor Codes, and discussed steps employers should take to remain complaint with new employment laws. We had a great audience and exchange of view points and tips for practitioners.

I look forward to another great year with The Contra Costa County Bar Association!

Employers and Employees Should Be Careful About Personal Mobile Devices In The Workplace


Employers and Employees Should Be Careful About Personal Mobile Devices In The Workplace

What are your policies about using personal mobile devices in the workplace?

Have you, or someone you know, recently bought a personal mobile device (iPad, iPod, Smartphone, Android Tablet, etc.)? Do you plan on giving (or hope to receive) such devices during the upcoming holidays? If so, you are like millions of others in the country.

Employers: are you prepared for the continued increase of employees with personal social media devices?

Employees: are you planning to use your personal mobile devices in the workplace, or to bring your devices to work, and if you so, what issues do you face?

Employers should take steps now to implement new, or revisit old, policies to address the continuing influx of personal mobile social media devices. Some of the issues focus on data/security breaches, wage and hour issues, and ensuring policies are as state-of-the-art as the technology the policies deal with. Employees should thoughtfully consider if they wish to use personal devices for work purposes, or to even use such devices at the workplace. In my article titled “More Employees With Personal Mobile Devices Means More Problems In The Workplace” I examine a few of these important issues.

Continue to stay updated on these, and similar, important issues by reading my monthly contributions on Social Media and Employment Law at Windmill Networking, and by following my posts here as well.

California Law Regarding Voting Time Off


California Law Regarding Voting Time Off

What does California law mandate as voting time off?

The debates between President Obama and Governor Romney are done, and last minute campaigning is in high gear. Both parties want as many voters as possible on election day – November 6, 2012. I’ve been receiving questions from California employers and employees about employee time off to vote, so I’m happy to provide a summary of the California law (California Elections Code 14000-14003), and a link to the required employer notice.

What do employers need to provide (what are employees entitled to) regarding time off to vote?

In California, the polls on election days are open from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. If an employee is scheduled to be at work during that time, and thus, does not have sufficient time outside of working hours to vote, then the employee is allowed to take time off to vote. Unless the employer and employee agree, the time off for voting can only be used at the beginning or end of the employee’s regular work shift (whichever provides the most free time for voting and the least time off from work).

Is the time off to vote paid or unpaid?

California employees are entitled to take as much time off as needed to vote. Only up to two hours of that time off, however, must be paid. The employer can, but is not required to, pay for any time off to vote beyond two hours.

What notice to employees must an employer provide?

Every California employer must post an elections notice not less than 10 days before election day (this year, by Saturday, October 27). Here is a copy of the required “Time Off To Vote” notice from the California Secretary of State. It is also a common practice to include this information in an Employee Handbook.

What notice to employers must an employee provide?

If an employee believes time off to vote will be needed, the employee must notify the employer at least two working days before the election.

Note: These requirements are for California employers and employees. If you have employees (or are employed) in a different state, the law may be different.

Image courtesy of Yahoo News

New CA Law and First NLRB Decision on Social Media in the Workplace


New CA Law and First NLRB Decision on Social Media in the Workplace

Social Media in the Workplace: New California Law places restrictions on employer access to social media.

The landscape regarding social media in the workplace continues to evolve at a fairly rapid pace. In my article, titled: “New California Law and New NLRB Decision On Social Media” I detail two key developments for employers. First, in late September, California Governor Jerry Brown signed a new law (California AB 1844) that places certain restrictions on employer access to employee social media accounts. Read my post to learn more about the California law, and how it differs from the new laws enacted in two other states.

In addition, I analyze a September 2012 decision by the National Labor Relations Board concerning policies at Costco Wholesale Corp. This is the first time the NLRB has issued a decision on many policies that typically appear in a company’s social media policy. Employers should review both the new California law, and the new NLRB decision, and prepare themselves for further states passing laws, and further NLRB decisions regarding employee policies and social media.

Continue to stay updated on these, and similar, important issues by reading my monthly contributions on Social Media and Employment Law at Windmill Networking, and by following my posts here as well.