maximize social business

Employment Law: Job Transitions and Social Media Profiles


Employment Law: Job Transitions and Social Media Profiles
What are you responsibilities, according to employment law, to update your social media profiles?In my June 2013 post regarding Social Media and Employment Law for Windmill Networking (Now MaximizeSocialBusiness.com), I focus on a very common situation: when an employee separates from a company but may not have a new job lined up. The employee may feel reluctant to update LinkedIn (or other profiles) due to embarrassment about losing a job, or the delay in updating may simply be a strategic choice because getting a new job is typically easier when potential employers believe you are still gainfully employed. My post, titled “5 Tips on Job Transitions and Updating Social Media Profiles,” explores whether a former employer can require/force a former employee to update a social media profile, and tips for both employers and employees in this developing area of the law.

Off-Color Jokes Get Two People Fired


Off-Color Jokes Get Two People Fired

HR Law: Do you know what mistakes got these people fired?

A woman is attending a general session at a conference. The audience is predominantly male. The woman hears two men sitting behind her make jokes about “big dongles” and “forking the repo.” Woman snaps a photo of the two men with her smartphone camera, posts that picture on her Twitter account (approximately 14,000 followers), and says: “Not cool. Jokes about forking repos in a sexual way and ‘big’ dongles. Right behind me.”

Eventually, two people are fired by their employers. And one of them is probably not who you think.

In my April post titled: “Lessons About Forking and Big Dongle Jokes” I make some legal sense about this real-life situation that has caught the attention of employees, employers, hackers, and even Anonymous. You can also catch-up and read all my other posts about Social Media and Employment Law at Windmill Networking (Now MaximizeSocialBusiness.com).

Social Media and Employment Law


Social Media and Employment Law

I am honored and excited to let you all know that I have become a monthly contributor to Windmill Networking, an organization dedicated to helping businesses and professionals leverage social media. Not surprisingly, I am providing content on the topic of Social Media and Employment Law. My monthly posts will appear during the first week of each month. Of course, I will continue to post updates here as well.

My April 2012 post is titled “Employers Be Cautious Using Social Media To Screen Job Applicants.” This article looks into the use, pitfalls, and challenges of using social media in recruiting and hiring, and discusses the well-publicized topic of employers demanding social media (Facebook) login credentials from applicants.

My May 2012 article examines guidance from the National Labor Relations Board regarding employer policies on social media in the workplace. This post is titled: “Employers: Don’t Ignore These Two Acronyms for Social Media Policy Compliance.

Windmill Networking is lead by Neal Shaffer, a Forbes Top 30 Social Media Power Influencer, and the blog where my posts appear is an AdAge Top 150 Global Marketing Blog. Not only will you find my monthly posts, but you will also be able to read tips on how you and your company can use all types of social media for marketing, public relations, B2B, and more.