NLRB

Surprising Facebook Firing Decision By The National Labor Relations Board


Surprising Facebook Firing Decision By The National Labor Relations Board

This Facebook firing decision may surprise you.

Employee takes pictures of events at work. Employee posts pictures of those events on his Facebook page. Employee also makes sarcastic comments about the pictures and events. Employee is fired for these activities.

This chain of events is becoming more and more common. Discharged employees have typically gone to Court to pursue their claims. Lately, though, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has become very active regarding issues concerning social media use in the workplace. In October 2012, the NLRB issued its first Facebook Firing decision. In my article, I examine the case and explain the decision reached by the NLRB; a decision that may surprise you.

Continue to stay updated on these, and similar, important issues by reading my monthly contributions on Social Media and Employment Law at Windmill Networking, and by following my posts here as well.

New CA Law and First NLRB Decision on Social Media in the Workplace


New CA Law and First NLRB Decision on Social Media in the Workplace

Social Media in the Workplace: New California Law places restrictions on employer access to social media.

The landscape regarding social media in the workplace continues to evolve at a fairly rapid pace. In my article, titled: “New California Law and New NLRB Decision On Social Media” I detail two key developments for employers. First, in late September, California Governor Jerry Brown signed a new law (California AB 1844) that places certain restrictions on employer access to employee social media accounts. Read my post to learn more about the California law, and how it differs from the new laws enacted in two other states.

In addition, I analyze a September 2012 decision by the National Labor Relations Board concerning policies at Costco Wholesale Corp. This is the first time the NLRB has issued a decision on many policies that typically appear in a company’s social media policy. Employers should review both the new California law, and the new NLRB decision, and prepare themselves for further states passing laws, and further NLRB decisions regarding employee policies and social media.

Continue to stay updated on these, and similar, important issues by reading my monthly contributions on Social Media and Employment Law at Windmill Networking, and by following my posts here as well.