Restrictive Covenants

LinkedIn Contacts: To Whom Do They Belong?


LinkedIn Contacts: To Whom Do They Belong?

Do you voluntarily use LinkedIn to help your employer promote business, services and/or products? Does your company request, or require employees to use LinkedIn to further develop client/customer/vendor relationships?

What happens if/when the employment relationship ends on a sour note? Will there be a battle between employer and employee regarding the ownership of the LinkedIn contacts, and perhaps the account(s) used?

In my November 2014 post titled “Employer vs. Employee: Ownership of LinkedIn Contacts” I explored these questions and others that employers and employees may face when the employment relationship ends and ownership of LinkedIn information becomes disputed. While courts have yet to publish many decisions on this issue, I focused on a federal court case (Eagle v. Morgan) that provides some guidance to employers.

I also added four tips for employers to prevent such disputes from arising and to help employers maintain control and ownership of LinkedIn information former employees have used/developed on their employer’s behalf.

Social Media’s Impact On Non Solicitation Agreements – Tips for Employers and Employees


Social Media’s Impact On Non Solicitation Agreements – Tips for Employers and Employees

Don’t allow your ex-employees to walk off with your clients. Always have a non solicitation agreement in place.

Now days, people change jobs frequently. And, when they start and end a job with one company, they are typically subject to all sorts of contractual obligations, including non-disparagement, and non-solicitation of customers and other employees.

What can/should a person post on his/her LinkedIn page, Facebook status, and Twitter feed about leaving one company to join another? What would be considered “solicitation,” and thus, a violation of a contractual provision? How can employers protect against a departing employee from soliciting other employees (and customers) from departing as well. In my May 2013 post regarding Social Media in the Workplace for Windmill Networking (Now MaximizeSocialBusiness.com), I provide 6 tips for employers and employees in dealing with social media and non-solicitation agreements. The article is creatively titled: “Social Media In the Workplace: 6 Tips Regarding Non Solicitation Agreements“.