Social Media and employment law

Maximize Your Social: Add This Book To Your Reading List!


Maximize Your Social: Add This Book To Your Reading List!

Want to know more about Social Media in the Workplace? Add this book to your reading list.

This Spring, I was asked to contribute to “Maximize Your Social: A One-Stop Guide to Building a Social Media Strategy for Marketing and Business Success” authored by Neal Schaffer and published by Wiley. I immediately said yes! My contribution to his book focuses on (to the surprise of no one) issues regarding social media in the workplace and policies to address those issues.

This book truly is very helpful for businesses regarding social media strategy and managing the risks associated with social media. Click on the link above for more information about it. You can also follow Maximize Social Business, an Advertising Age Top 100 Global Marketing Blog, for more great content about social media for marketing and business success, including my monthly contributions. This blog was created by Neal Schaffer, who has been named a Forbes Top 50 Social Media Power Influencer two years in a row.

More States Pass Workplace Password Protection Laws


More States Pass Workplace Password Protection Laws

A new law went into effect on October 1, 2013 regarding social media password protection in the workplace. Two more laws will go into effect in the next few months, and several more could be passed next year. And, unfortunately, this trend does not appear to be ending anytime soon.

In my recent post for Maximize Social Business, which is creatively titled: “New Password Protection Laws In The Workplace,” I analyze some of these new laws and point out similarities and differences which may cause headaches for multi-state employers. Even single-State employers need to be aware of legislation in other states as well as their own because such laws are spreading quickly around the country. It is never too late to contact me, or another employment law/HR attorney to help your business comply with legal requirements and implement strategies to reduce legal risks so that you can focus on running a successful business.

Personal Devices in the Workplace Policy – What Employees and Employers Need To Consider


Personal Devices in the Workplace Policy – What Employees and Employers Need To Consider

New potential for disaster in workplace employment law is BYOD (bring your own device).

The number of individuals owning and using personal mobile devices continues to skyrocket. Employers can no longer simply bury their head in the sand to this phenomenon. Instead they should address this issue head-on by either creating a Bring Your Own Device (“BYOD”) policy, or a policy prohibiting the use of personal devices in the workplace. In doing so, employers need to analyze many legal and security issues regarding their employees bringing and using personal devices in the workplace.

Employees too should consider whether they truly want to use personal devices for work purposes and the loss of privacy and other ramifications for doing so.

In my latest post for Maximize Social Business titled “Workplace BYOD Policy: One Size Does Not Fit All” I analyze many of the pros and cons and other issues regarding the use of personal devices in the workplace. What position has your employer taken on the personal devices in the workplace policy (BYOD) trend? If your employer has not addressed this issue head on, do you use your own device for any work-related purposes (like checking work email)?

Employers Beware: The New NLRB is Coming!


Employers Beware: The New NLRB is Coming!

The new NLRB is coming. Learn more about employment law and ways to deal with workplace issues.

For the first time in about a decade, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) will be at full capacity. Even under turmoil for 2012, the board was active in dealing with workplace issues for unionized and non-unionized employers.

These issues included social media policies and practices, at-will provisions, confidentiality during investigations and “Facebook firings.”

In my August 2013 article for Maximize Social Business, I examine the recent history, the current status of the NLRB, and what employers should do to gear up for a newly formed NLRB. My article is titled: “4 Tips for Employers to Prepare for the New NLRB“.

Employment Law: Job Transitions and Social Media Profiles


Employment Law: Job Transitions and Social Media Profiles
What are you responsibilities, according to employment law, to update your social media profiles?In my June 2013 post regarding Social Media and Employment Law for Windmill Networking (Now MaximizeSocialBusiness.com), I focus on a very common situation: when an employee separates from a company but may not have a new job lined up. The employee may feel reluctant to update LinkedIn (or other profiles) due to embarrassment about losing a job, or the delay in updating may simply be a strategic choice because getting a new job is typically easier when potential employers believe you are still gainfully employed. My post, titled “5 Tips on Job Transitions and Updating Social Media Profiles,” explores whether a former employer can require/force a former employee to update a social media profile, and tips for both employers and employees in this developing area of the law.